GrubWrites

Apply to a Novel Intensive

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Novel Generator

Ready to write the first draft of your novel? GrubStreet’s Novel Generator is a 9-month program designed to help students at all levels complete the first drafts of their novels.

Writing a first draft is a very different process from revising a finished draft. A writer working on their first draft is discovering the answers to the most basic questions about their novel as they writes: Who are these people

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Grub News

Join Us for Our In-Person Novel Incubator Open House & Info Session on 12/8

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Interested in taking your novel to the next level? If so, GrubStreet’s competitive and affordable MFA-level Novel Incubator is for you. Over 12 months, writers will revise their novels, study the novel form, and gain a thoughtful introduction to the publishing world. For most of the 12-month program, students meet in three-hour workshops on Monday evenings at GrubStreet HQ

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Grub News

Do Authors Really Need to be a "Brand"?

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When I teach workshops on writing and/or publishing, I often start out by asking writers to work on the "one-liner" for their projects, whether fiction, nonfiction, or collections. I encourage them to try winnowing it down to just one line — and no, that single line can't comprise 200 words.

Usually someone will ask, sometimes a little aggressively, "Why?" The subtext is perfectly reasonable: their book or collection is too complex to be expressed in one line

Katrin Schumann

When Being a Writer Means Playing the Waiting Game

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By Katrin Schumann

You may have heard, these days many writers are waiting. Waiting to hear back from their overwhelmed agents. Waiting to hear from busy publishers. Waiting for Covid to really be OVER so they can do live book events again. Waiting for inspiration becuase they're exhausted by the last year and a half. Waiting because their release dates have been moved (again).

Katrin Schumann

Books & Reading The Writing Life

What to Do After Attending a Writing Conference

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Writers attending conferences - like last week's The Muse & The Marketplace 2021 - tend to react to the experience in one of two ways: despair or elation.

 

Camp #1 is overwhelmed with information. Too much of the advice they absorbed seemed contradictory or overly complicated. They’re not sure they even like agents and editors anymore. And dammit, if all those other attendees are trying to get published, how do they stand a chance? 

Katrin Schumann

Books & Reading Craft Advice Grub News The Writing Life